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Collections update: Move means temporary lack of access to some materials

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Due to the work being done to support the current collection move in the Library, the print serials, government documents, and microfilm located at the back of Level 1 are temporarily unavailable for browsing. However, if you need to access these items, we can still get them for you! If you need to access any print serials or government documents from this section, please request the article or volume through Omni. You will see a message that the items are not loanable, but you can still request either a digital copy of the article you are looking for or request the print copy from another library. If you need access to a larger portion of the print serials or government document collections, please contact Library Services in advance of your visit to the Library so that we can work out the best way for you to access the materials. If you need to access the microfilm or microfiche, please speak to someone at the Services Desk or contact Library Services prior to your visit. We will ret

Updates to Omni and interlibrary loans

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  Here is up-to-date information from my colleague Judy Senecal on using the latest version of Omni and borrowing books via rapid interlibrary loans.  Carleton + Omni Libraries We have now made the default search in Omni “Carleton + Omni Libraries,” where Omni Libraries are all of the Ontario postsecondary libraries that participate in the development and use of this search tool. Here is a list of Omni partner libraries. Rapid interlibrary loans (ILL) and borrowing books Now that the default search is the collections for all the Omni partner libraries, now when you search Omni, you may see books in your result list that say they're "unavailable" from Carleton. While we don't have it, one or more of the other Omni libraries does.   To help you request books from another Omni library, we've integrated a new, faster interlibrary loan service into Omni.  Here are some things to consider if you want a  book from another library: Is it going to be used for a course? If

Fall 2021: Library services (Part II)

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  So Reading Week has come and gone ... and I actually did some reading, although not as much writing as I would have liked to have done. Why does that always seem to happen? (Big cosmic question.) In any case, I did get a bit of rest and hope that others did as well — rest, relaxation and maybe a chance to catch up on research and course work.  Here are some more specialized resources that may be of interest to graduate students (and faculty) as the term progresses: Archives and Special Collections is comprised of three overarching focus areas: Archives, Rare Books, and Specialized Research Collections. Cartographic and GIS Services will help provide guidance on the creation and use of maps, including help in finding data, spatial analysis, software, and process selection, converting file types, and much more. Data Services can help by providing links to thousands of datasets, both microdata and aggregate data, to use for secondary resear

Fall 2021: Library presentation on grad services

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  We live on this lovely, long country road that shakes hands with the Winchester Bog. I love to walk it--so critical to get out of the house and out of my head after a day in front of  "the screen." And the sunsets at this time of year always pull me into the universe. I can share this experience via a photo or two and can also share  a few highlights of our services and upcoming events that may be of interest to grad students: Services for graduate students : borrowing, qualitative research software (Nvivo), and more. Upcoming event co-hosted with the GSA : Wednesday   October 6, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. I am one of several librarians who will be making presentations and look forward to sharing some thoughts on conducting literature reviews. Our collection of academic databases to find articles in scholarly journals. And, as always, consider signing up for the  GSA Bulletin , which include weekly Library updates. If you have any

Fall 2021: Library services (Part I)

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  Ar e these late summer or early fall sugar peas? I’m torn. I planted this crop after the storm that plowed through our little corner of Eastern Ontario in mid July. Hail the size of large pieces of rock salt shredded Hosta leaves, corn stocks, and my peas as well as beans that were just ready for picking. Fortunately, some of that first crop of vegetables was harvestable (and tasted good!). As an experiment, I decided to plant more sugar peas and cosmos (love their cheerfully waving blooms) the week after the storm. Low and behold! The seeds took, the plants grew, and we are about to enjoy our second crop. The resilience of Mother Earth. And just in time for seasonal change—in my garden and on campus. Although “on campus” is a relative term. I am not “on campus” in this fall of 2021. I am still teaching essentially online and look forward to supporting faculty and undergraduate as well as graduate students via Brightspace. I’m also available for individual research co

Update on library services: RapidILL and more

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  No need to turn yourself upside down or inside out trying to figure out what's happening at the library. Here are some updates (and there are more to come). Data, data, and more data management support Looking for microdata or aggregate data to support your research? Whether it's national or international data, we can help you! Check out  this page  or email us at  dataservices@carleton.ca for more information. Our Research Data Centre Branch Office offers secure access to detailed microdata from Statistics Canada, including the Census and some administrative databases. Check out  this page  or email us at  rdc@cunet.carleton.ca Despite the COVID-19 restrictions, it remains open, with appropriate safety and health measures in effect. For help with research data management and writing a data management plan (to comply with the  Tri-Agency Guidelines ), check out  this page  or email us at  rdm@library.carleton.c

Personal librarian: Help with publishing projects

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The library has a variety of resources if you’re planning on publishing . These resources will guide you in selecting where you should submit your writing . These include: journal ranking tools   Ulrichsweb which lets you find publications by subject, type (scholarly journal, magazine, etc.), and whether they are peer-reviewed or otherwise refereed.  Here’s a video I’ve made on using UlrichsWeb, especially for finding “hard-to-find” sources. Make sure you’re publishing in reputable journal: The How to assess a journal guide provides a list of criteria to consider with assessing an academic publication. Predatory publishers use aggressive and deceptive practices to convince researchers to publish in sub-standard journals that are not properly peer-reviewed or edited. Articles published in these journals are lost–they cannot be republished in another journal and will not be counted in the standard metrics used to measure the impact of your research. APCs (article processing charges) ar